Dodson possesses a beautiful, ringing, and agile countertenor.
— Angelo Mao, Boston Classical Review, reviewing Ueno's Gallo
The title character, a rooster (countertenor Douglas Dodson, in bright, pellucid voice throughout), first appears in the guise of the legendary castrato Farinelli, full of 18th-century roulades and graces ... Dodson delivers a twittering, show-stopping aria: weighty philosophical critiques rendered into a fanciful clucking, chirping patois.
— Matthew Guerrieri, The Boston Globe, reviewing Ueno's Gallo
Douglas Dodson’s unusually sparkling countertenor made listening to this rare male voice – often difficult for novice opera-goers – a delightfully theatrical experience.
— Lisa Jo Sagolla, The Kansas City Star, reviewing Purcell's The Fairy Queen
Photo courtesy of Aldeburgh Music

Photo courtesy of Aldeburgh Music

The very sweetness of countertenor Douglas Dodson’s sound ... bore witness to the line “Music for awhile shall all your cares beguile” in his performance of the eponymous composition. Moreover, Dodson was so well attuned to his text that his delivery recalled a sonnet well recited, his physicality illustrating but never overburdening his words.
— Kate Stringer, The Boston Musical Intelligencer, reviewing The Henry Purcell Society of Boston's The Incidental Theatre Music of Henry Purcell
Douglas Dodson plays the Rooster and shows off a brilliantly textured counter-tenor voice ... as the opera moves on, he is able to flex some wonderful vocal muscle and impresses with his later scenes.
— Brian Boruta, My Entertainment World, reviewing Ueno's Gallo
Douglas Dodson (countertenor) gave a beautiful rendition of David. The role is often perceived as flat but [conductor Scott Allen] Jarrett makes a case for the difficulty of being the outsider at court. Dodson’s performance was not flat; his aria, ‘Impious wretch, of race accurst!’ was an exercise in barely controlled wrath and modeled the fury, the power, of a countertenor crossed. [Tenor Matthew] Anderson and Dodson together captured the friendship between Jonathan and David, the tenderness and affection evident in their voices and glances.
— Cashman Kerr Prince, The Boston Musical Intelligencer, reviewing Handel's Saul
Countertenor Douglas Dodson brought strong, beautiful vocalism, a fine sense of musical line and spot-on intonation to “But who may abide.”
— Lawrence Budmen, South Florida Classical Review, reviewing Handel's Messiah
With soprano Aliana de la Guardia, from Guerrilla Opera's production of Gallo. Photo by Liz Linder Photography

With soprano Aliana de la Guardia, from Guerrilla Opera's production of Gallo. Photo by Liz Linder Photography

With mezzo-soprano Carrie Cheron, from Guerilla Opera's production of Pedr Solis. Photo by Liz Linder Photography

With mezzo-soprano Carrie Cheron, from Guerilla Opera's production of Pedr Solis. Photo by Liz Linder Photography

Three visitors from ‘the World’—ranging from deep bass (Tom McNichols) to a vivid countertenor (Douglas Dodson), with a fine baritone (David Kravitz) in between—became an almost-comic trio as they fruitlessly importuned Simon to use his wealth to rescue the fast-deteriorating planet.
— Heidi Waleson, The Wall Street Journal, reviewing Machover's Death and the Powers
[Dodson’s] long runs were excellent and his particular decorations ... were remarkably agile. Some countertenors tend to hoot in the upper register; Douglas avoided this with such a pleasant pleasing tone, so pure and easy on the ear.
— Rex Hearn, Palm Beach ArtsPaper, reviewing Handel's Messiah
Countertenor Douglas Dodson sang offstage, his voice haunting in its unearthly beauty.
— John Kochevar, The Boston Musical Intelligencer, reviewing Ueno's Gallo
Douglas Dodson brought a ... warm, well-controlled countertenor voice and a fine sense of Handelian style to the role of Argante.
— Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun, reviewing Handel's Rinaldo
[A] rooster (the impressive and uninhibited countertenor Douglas Dodson) and a compulsive shopper and/or stripper and/or Earth Mother (Guerilla’s equally uninhibited general manager, soprano Aliana de le Guardia) are having it out in a sandbox filled with Cheerios ... I can’t entirely explain this—but I believed it, [and] was gripped by it.
— Lloyd Schwartz, New York Arts, reviewing Ueno's Gallo
From Lowell House Opera's production of A Midsummer Night's Dream.  Photo courtesy of Lowell House Opera

From Lowell House Opera's production of A Midsummer Night's Dream.  Photo courtesy of Lowell House Opera

As Oberon, Douglas Dodson was a commanding presence ... His voice is supple and, when in full cry, clarion-like ... As an actor, Dodson was alert and properly devious in devising the traps and snares for the hapless humans and even for his Queen Tytania ... and then managed well the gradual transition to contrition as he saw the ignominy to which Tytania had sunk in her involuntary obsession with Bottom.
— Vance R. Koven, The Boston Musical Intelligencer, reviewing Britten's A Midsummer Night's Dream
The stand-out singers were Victoria Botero (Titania), Jay Carter (Secresie/Phoebus), and Douglas Dodson (First Fairy) ... Having two stellar countertenors on one stage was amazing and their voices were in great form ... Dodson sang his acrobatic aria, ‘Hark how all things,’ with aplomb and in his duet with Botero was balanced, restrained, and lovely.
— Lee Hartman, KCMetropolis.org, reviewing Purcell's The Fairy Queen